Does it matter if she is a Christian?

I know very, very little about Kate DiCamillo other than what I have read in her book The Tale of Despereaux referenced here, and a few things that I’ve picked up along the way (that she used to work at Half-Price Books is of particular interest to my daughter-in-law who works at Half-Price Books). I know as well that she lives someplace cold and is single. That’s about it.

That’s her picture here. She has curly hair. But I don’t know her spiritual commitments.

Now, the passage I quoted earlier could be read to be a clear reference to the Christian’s understanding of Christ’s substitutionary atonement. Did she mean it? or am I right in seeing it there?

Irrelevant questions, those, ultimately.

I’d love to hear that this wonderful writer is a Christian. But at the level of her storytelling, it really does not matter. God has woven his character and his story into the fabric of the universe in a way that it is hard to avoid. And he sometimes graces unbelievers with such rich gifts of insight and expression that they cannot help but see it.

As she in this case simply notes that a mere ‘goodbye’ cannot hold a candle to a ‘let me die for you’, she need not be a Christian to observe this. She speaks truthfully and in her truthfulness, God gives us a gift.

My point should be obvious. If we read only those things written by those claiming to be Christians, we will miss some of the most wonderful insights that God himself has for his people.

This principle applies to music and other forms of art as well.

You agree?

6 thoughts on “Does it matter if she is a Christian?

  1. TulipGirl

    “My point should be obvious. If we read only those things written by those claiming to be Christians, we will miss some of the most wonderful insights that God himself has for his people.”Conversely, if we read only those things written by those claiming to be Christians and read them uncritically, we can be easily misled and miss some of the most wonderful insights that God himself has for his people.

  2. arsapphire

    I agree with you, and so does John Calvin:”Therefore, in reading profane authors, the admirable light of truth displayed in them should remind us, that the human mind, however much fallen and perverted from its original integrity, is still adorned and invested with admirable gifts from its Creator. If we reflect that the Spirit of God is the only fountain of truth, we will be careful, as we would avoid offering insult to him, not to reject or condemn truth wherever it appears. In despising the gifts, we insult the Giver.”-Calvin, Institutes II.ii.15

  3. arsapphire

    I actually found that quote from the Institutes in Jerram Barrs’s book “Echoes of Eden.” (pg.23) I think anybody interested in this subject would benefit from reading this book, when it is published (I don’t think it is yet…I just have a copy of the manuscript)

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